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Murdolo and Quiazon (2016) – Key Issues in Working with Men from Immigrant and Refugee Communities in Preventing Violence against Women

Overview

This report
…explores the key issues in working with men from immigrant and refugee communities in Australia to prevent violence against women. It applies a feminist intersectional approach to the question of men’s engagement and examines a range of issues that need to be considered in the development of primary prevention engagement strategies for immigrant and refugee men.

The report is divided into four sections. Section 1 outlines the context for engaging immigrant and refugee men in violence prevention and describes the need to apply a feminist intersectional approach. Section 2 discusses the ways in which immigrant and refugee men negotiate their conception of their masculinities during migration and settlement. Migration, employment-related difficulties and discrimination impact on immigrant and refugee men’s sense of gendered identity. The diversity of immigrant and refugee men’s responses to migration-related challenges should be accounted for in violence prevention programs.

Violence against women is endemic across Australian communities and cultures. While marginalised women experience a heightened vulnerability to gendered violence, there is insufficient evidence that any one culture or community, migrant or otherwise, is more or less violent than any other. However, in media and popular culture, immigrant and refugee men and cultures are represented as being more ‘traditional’, oppressive to women and as having greater tendency to commit violence against women. Conversely, immigrant and refugee women are portrayed as more oppressed, passive and lacking in agency. In this regard, Section 3 examines conceptions of ‘culture’ as it relates to immigrant and refugee men and highlights the need to adapt a complex understanding of ‘culture’ in order to re-frame our understandings of immigrant and refugee men’s capacity to prevent violence.

Section 4 outlines key strategies for engaging immigrant and refugee men in prevention. Immigrant and refugee men should be engaged in violence prevention through the leadership of women. Valuing, fostering and harnessing immigrant and refugee women’s feminist activism and leadership boosts gender equity within immigrant and refugee communities. In addition, direct participation strategies aimed at men should be framed within a global human rights and social justice perspective, convey positive, concrete and meaningful messages, and be aimed at achieving long-term, gender-transformative gains and solutions. Importantly, developing and implementing strategies to engage immigrant and refugee men should focus on cultural specificity (as opposed to difference), which takes into account different men’s relative spheres of influence within and across cultures.

Although the report identifies promising and culturally appropriate practices and approaches, it is important to note that there is an extremely limited evidence base to draw from to make accurate assertions about the most effective ways of engaging immigrant and refugee men in violence prevention in Australia. Further research and evaluation, conducted along-side violence prevention efforts, are essential.

-Excerpt from Text, Executive Summary, p. 5.


Reference

Murdolo, Adele, and Regina Quiazon2016. Key Issues in Working with Men from Immigrant and Refugee Communities in Preventing Violence against Women. North Sydney: White Ribbon Australia.

Identifiers

  • ISBN: 9780987165398

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Notes

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Murdolo and Quiazon (2016) – Key Issues in Working with Men from Immigrant and Refugee Communities in Preventing Violence against Women

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Table of Contents