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Kilmartin et al. (2008) – A Real Time Social Norms Intervention to Reduce Male Sexism

Abstract

College males’ overestimation of peers’ sexism may result in reluctance to challenge these toxic attitudes. Researchers investigated the power of a brief intervention to correct these cognitive distortions in Southeastern U.S. undergraduate samples of unacquainted (N = 65; 86.2% Caucasian) and acquainted males (N = 63; 82% Caucasian). Participants first reported self-perceptions of attitudes toward women and then estimated the attitudes of other men present. Intervention participants attended brief presentations that included feedback on discrepancies between actual and perceived norms within their groups. At 3 week follow up, there was a significant decrease in perceptions of peers’ sexism for intervention groups, indicating that a brief intervention may be useful in sexism reduction.


Reference

Kilmartin, Christopher, Tempe Smith, Alison Green, Harriotte Heinzen, Michael Kuchler, and David Kolar. 2008. “A Real Time Social Norms Intervention to Reduce Male Sexism.” Sex Roles 59(3):264–73. doi:10.1007/s11199-008-9446-y

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Kilmartin et al. (2008) – A Real Time Social Norms Intervention to Reduce Male Sexism

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