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Falade-Fatila and Adebayo (2020) – Male Partners’ Involvement in Pregnancy Related Care among Married Men in Ibadan, Nigeria

Abstract

Background: Maternal death remains a public health burden in the developing countries including Nigeria and the major causes are pregnancy related. Lack of male involvement in pregnancy related care is one of the contributing factors. Previous studies on male involvement focused on family planning services and were majorly targeted at women. This study, therefore, was carried out to assess the knowledge, perception and involvement of male partners in pregnancy related care among married men in Ibadan, Nigeria.

Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted using a four-stage sampling technique to select 367 married men in an urban community in Ibadan. A semi-structured, interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to obtain information on the knowledge, perception and involvement of respondents regarding pregnancy related care. Responses to questions on knowledge of pregnancy related care were converted to a 33-point scale. Scores greater than or equal to the mean knowledge score (26.2) were categorized as good knowledge of pregnancy related care. Similarly, responses to involvement in pregnancy related care questions were converted to a 24-point scale with scores greater than or equal to the mean (15.1) classified as good involvement in pregnancy related care. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and association between qualitative variables was established using Chi-square test at p < 0.05.

Results: Sixty-three percent had good knowledge of pregnancy related care. Majority believed that they had roles to play in their partners’ care during pregnancy (89.9%), labor and delivery (92.9%), and in newborn care (97.5%). Overall, 56.9% had good involvement in pregnancy related care. About 20% followed their partners to antenatal care (19.6%) and postnatal (19.9%) clinics. A significantly higher proportion of respondents with good knowledge accompanied their partners for antenatal care (p = 0.008) and postnatal care clinic (p = 0.014); participated in birth preparedness (p < 0.001) and assisted with newborn care (p < 0.001). Job demands, social stigma and long waiting time at the health facilities were reasons highlighted for non-involvement in pregnancy related care.

Conclusions: The study revealed gaps in knowledge and involvement in pregnancy related care. There is a need for reproductive health policy review to strongly emphasize the need for involvement of male partners in reproductive health issues including pregnancy related care.


Reference

Falade-Fatila, Olayinka, and Ayodeji Matthew Adebayo2020. “Male Partners’ Involvement in Pregnancy Related Care among Married Men in Ibadan, Nigeria.” Reproductive Health 17:14. doi:10.1186/s12978-020-0850-2.

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Falade-Fatila and Adebayo (2020) – Male Partners’ Involvement in Pregnancy Related Care among Married Men in Ibadan, Nigeria

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